Law, Technology & Arts Blog

Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts Publishes Summer 2013 Issue

Posted in University of Washington School of Law by LTA-Editor on August 25, 2013

The Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts (LTA Journal) has published its Summer 2013 Issue. The LTA Journal publishes concise legal analysis aimed at practicing attorneys on a quarterly basis.

The issue’s first article, by Managing Submissions Editor Caitlin Forsyth, is “Repairing the Antibiotic Pipeline: Can the GAIN Act Do It?” The article explores the GAIN Act, which incentivizes pharmaceutical companies to invest in antibiotic research and development, and suggests why the Act may not solve the growing antibiotic resistance problem.

Articles Editor Matthew Fredrickson contributed the second article, “Conformity in Confusion: Applying a Common Analysis to Wikipedia-Based Jury Misconduct.” The article discusses the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit’s decision inUnited States v. Lawson, a case of first impression about a juror’s use of Wikipedia during deliberations and the presumption of prejudice.

Managing Operations Editor Chelsey Heindel wrote the third article, “Medical Advances, Criminal Disadvantages: The Tension Between Contemporary Antiretroviral Therapy and Criminal HIV Exposure Laws in the Workplace.” The article addresses a 1988 exposure law which criminalizes intentionally exposing individuals to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The article highlights the stark contrast between the exposure law and the technological advances in HIV treatment, and considers the ways in which state legislatures and legal practitioners can simultaneously encourage responsible HIV treatment while honoring the utilitarian justifications underpinning criminal exposure laws.

The issue’s fourth article was written by Associate Editor-in-Chief of Production, Christopher Young. The article is titled “A First Amendment Defense to the Federal Cyberstalking Statute in the Age of Twitter” and suggests invoking the overbreadth doctrine to exonerate a client who is charged with violating the federal cyberstalking statute.

See the full issue here: https://digital.lib.washington.edu/dspace-law/bitstream/handle/1773.1/1273/9WJLTAno1Complete.pdf?sequence=1

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